Processing — June 30, 2015

Processing

Over the past few days I have been doing a lot of work with Processing. Processing is a Java-based language focused on visualization. I have been working on 2D and 3D displays with arrays. These are in preparation for programming the stretch sensing material I recently sketched out. This would be for the glove. Yesterday I focused on trilateration. This is commonly known as triangulation (they are different though) and involved using three known points and distances to find a fourth point. This would be used in the sensing fabric to locate each point in the fabric from a central series of points. I am planning on using this program to locate the points on the glove and then exporting these coordinates to Unity. Unity would then be able to map out the entire hand of the user. I think this is a good step forwards in creating this sensing fabric.

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Form Pixels — February 9, 2015

Form Pixels

Came up with this idea a few days ago. Using Electropermanent magnets, one could create “pixels” that can interact with one another based on charge. These interactions on a 2D surface such as fabric, could create a material that can flex and stretch in different ways. It would do so by creating “shapes,” with edges created when two pixels repel (have the same charge), and with the actual solid shape created with a checkerboard pattern of charges. Due to these properties, there are restrictions on what shapes can be created. If you think about a “shape” as having edges between pixels, there are certain rules for how shapes can be formed.

IMG_7003

When creating shapes, any point between pixels can have either 0, 2, or 4 lines stemming from it. It cannot have 1 or 3 lines stemming from it. This is because either 1 or 3 lines can create an issue in the arrangement of charges.

One can create intricate shapes or larger composite shapes. These larger shapes can be combined to create lines or structures that can react to shear forces.

IMG_7006

Calculations for MMPPF extension distances — October 30, 2014